Tuesday, November 10, 2015

LA Gadget Expo Cohen IP Law Group

Michael Cohen of Cohen IP Law Group will be presenting a 30 minute lecture on IP issues on December 6th at the LA Gadget Expo. We are also a Silver Sponsor of the LA Gadget Expo! They’re giving 50% off exhibitor fees to those of you who wish to exhibit (e-mail hello@lagadgetexpo.com for more information) and free admission for being a Cohen IP Law Group client. Use promo code ‘COHENIPLAW’ for complimentary admission to the event: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/la-gadget-expo-tickets-17334064654

Friday, October 23, 2015

Trademark and Patent Registrations Granted!

We have been extremely busy
at Cohen IP Law Group. Here are just some of the trademark and patent registrations we received this week alone. We are excited to exceed our 2014 total registrations for our clients!

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Cohen IP Law Group's Lawsuit Against Universal and Seth MacFarlane

Hollywood Reporter has covered Cohen IP Law Group’s recent lawsuit against Universal Pictures, Seth MacFarlane and other defendants for trade dress infringement and other claims.


Wednesday, February 18, 2015

$1.3 million Judgment Vacated by Cohen IP Law Group

Cohen IP Law Group is happy to announce that it has obtained an order today in favor of our client, from the Hon. Dale Fischer, vacating a $1.3 million judgment previously obtained by Beats Electronics.

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Alice is Harsh - Understanding Alice Corp for Patent Ineligible Subject Matter

The US Supreme Court’s decision in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank, which came down last June elaborated on patent ineligible subject matter, particularly as it applies to software patents.  But the scope of these 101 type rejections has expanded to business method patents as well.  We have been noticing an uptick in these rejections just in the past few months.  The ABA just posted this article discussing Alice’s wrath.



Monday, November 3, 2014

SEMA 2014 Las Vegas

Cohen IP Law Group will be attending SEMA 2014 in Las Vegas.  SEMA is the number one annual convention of automotive specialty products.  If you will be there, let us know!


Friday, October 10, 2014

Hershey Trademark Infringement Lawsuit Against Marijuana Edible Company

This past June, Hershey filed a lawsuit in Colorado Federal Court against TinctureBell, LLC and TinctureBelle Marijuanka LLC- two companies that marketed cannabis-laced chocolate bars that were allegedly packaged to look like Hershey products.  The causes of action listed in the complaint were: trademark infringement, trademark dilution, false designation of origin, unfair competition, and passing off.  The candies included “Hashees” peanut butter cups, and are packaged similar to Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups.  The Defendants’ Ganja Joy bars appear to look  similar to Almond Joys, and lastly, their HashHeath Bars appear to look identical to Hershey’s Heath Bars.

The lawsuit settled relatively quickly for unknown reasons.  If Hershey proceeded with litigation under its trademark infringement claims, it likely had a strong case under 43(a) of the Lanham act.  For starters, at the present time, federal trademark law does not yet protect any marks for cannabis products under the Controlled Substance Act (CSA), and further cannabis is still classified as a schedule 1 drug.  Additionally, the Defendants products at issue like “Hashees” very much resembled the look of Reese’s.  Accordingly, it’s not far-fetched to conclude that a Court may hold that the Defendants were diluting Hershey’s marks by associating a child-friendly and world-wide brand with getting high.

According to The Denver Business Journal, “[t]he settlement between Hershey and TinctureBelle requires the Colorado retailer to ‘destroy all remaining specimens of each product, including without limitation cartons, containers, packaging, wrappers, labels, displays and any other materials …’ TinctureBelle is also prevented from ‘making any false or disparaging statements about Hershey and its products.’” However, the settlement will not have any impact on TinctureBelle’s current products, as the owner of TinctureBell, Char Mayes claimed to have “changed our entire label line approximately six months ago, long before these allegations surfaced.”

The future of trademark protection for cannabis goods is fluid and changing, but even if it is given full trademark protection one day, “canni-preneurs” will not be protected if their packaging confuses the public and dilutes existing brands. Every startup company should strive to create their own, unique, and identifiable brand.  As the memorable marketing campaign by Apple once said, “Think Different.”